Bill Bowring: "Russia's 'intention not to be a party' is, in reality, completely irrelevant. [...] Russians can still be prosecuted whether or not Russia is a party."

posted 23 Nov 2016, 23:29 by Rights in Russia   [ updated 23 Nov 2016, 23:32 ]
"On Nov. 16 2016, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed an order agreeing that the Ministry of Justice should notify the UN of Russia’s “intention not to become a party” to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC). A statement by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs explained that Russia had signed the statute in 2000 (it never ratified it); expressed Russia’s view of the “failure” of the ICC; argued that it is “ineffective and one-sided;” and also noted that a number of African states are leaving the ICC. Russia could not trust the ICC’s response to the 2008 war between Russia and Georgia, it said. Confusion reigns as to what Russia wanted to achieve by this move. Legally speaking, however, its actions are largely irrelevant. [...] Russia's “intention not to be a party” is, in reality , completely irrelevant. Yes, if it had become a “party” it would have to cooperate with the Prosecutor, as the UK is doing in relation to its actions in Iraq. But Russians can still be prosecuted whether or not Russia is a party."

Source:
Bill Bowring: 'Why Russia’s Move to "Quit" International Criminal Court Is Legally Irrelevant,' The Moscow Times, 22 November 2016
Comments